Skylark Books

Rudolf Steiner in the Waldorf School - Waldorf Education lecturesRudolf Steiner in the Waldorf School
Lectures and Addresses to Children, Parents and Teachers
24 lectures and 1 essay by Rudolf Steiner

Ultimately, isn't it a very holy and religious obligation to cultivate and educate the divine spiritual element that manifests anew in every human being who is born? Isn't this educational service a religious service in the highest sense of the word? Isn't it so that our holiest stirrings, which we dedicate to religious feeling, must all come together in our service at the altar when we attempt to cultivate the divine spiritual aspect of the human being, whose potentials are revealed in the growing child?                                                    - Rudolf Steiner, Sept. 7, 1919

This book contains all of the more-or-less informal talks given by Steiner in the Stuttgart school from 1919 to1924. Included are speeches given by him at various school assemblies, parents' evenings, and other meetings. Steiner spoke here with spontaneity, warmth, and enthusiasm.

Readers will find a unique personal glimpse of Rudolf Steiner and how he viewed the school and the educational philosophy he brought into being.

Trans: C. E. Creeger (1 essay & 24 lectures and addresses, 1919-1924, GA298); 244pp
Anthroposophic Press
ISBN: 0 88010 433 3; paperback
 




 

Rudolf Steiner (1861-1925) called his spiritual philosophy 'anthroposophy', which he defined as 'the consciousness of one's humanity', and the disciplined methods of studying this he termed ‘spiritual science’.  As a highly developed clairvoyant and spiritual initiate, he spoke from his direct cognition of the spiritual world. However, he did not see his work as religious or sectarian, but rather sought to found a universal 'science of the spirit'.

His many published works (written books and lectures) - which include his research into the spiritual nature of the human being, the evolution of the world and humanity, and methods of personal development - invite readers to develop their own spiritual faculties.  He also provided indications for the renewal of many human activities, including education - both general and special - agriculture, medicine, economics, architecture, science, philosophy, religion and the arts. He wrote some 30 books and delivered over 6000 lectures across Europe, and in 1924 founded the General Anthroposophical Society which today has branches throughout the world.
 


Copyright © 2003 Skylark Books